Vision map design workflows

A collection of videos of workflows for designing a vision map. More to follow!

Instructions for how to incorporate hand-drawn images into Illustrator.

Workflow that includes a digital template that's traced by hand and scanned back into Illustrator  to achieve a hand-drawn look.

High-level overview of the entire approach to vision mapping.

What is a Vision Map?

In preparation for two upcoming courses on how to design Vision Maps, we designed this explainer video using Google TiltBrush VR.

The first pilot class will be offered through NOVA Scribes on Feb. 16 at 6:30PM in Chantilly, VA.  https://www.meetup.com/NOVA-Scribes/events/235519650/

The second class will be offered through the Mid-Atlantic Facilitators' Network on Feb. 24 at 8:30AM in Washington, DC.  http://www.mafn.org/event-2317338

Thanks to Heather Martinez, Trent Wakenight, and Ben Tinker for fantastic feedback!

Words as Objects

Here's a neat idea for both visual templates and vision maps: use the shape of words to create objects and elements.  

Visual template to harvest what's working, what's not working, and solutions to advance both.  

Visual template to harvest what's working, what's not working, and solutions to advance both.  

99 Visual Templates

On the topic of Visual Templates, Bas Bakker just released a free ebook with 99 visual templates AND ideas for how to design others. They're simple, "one function" templates that you can draw with a moment's notice and use to facilitate a discussion. Good stuff in here!

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B01MXIIG4X/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1479383527&sr=1-1&pi=SY200_QL40&keywords=how+to+design+visual+templates&dpPl=1&dpID=51u3O%2BcVC0L&ref=plSrch

Storymap Project Lessons – A Designer’s Perspective by Tiffany Forner

Advice from Tiffany Forner of the Grove Consultants on storymapping. 

"I’ve worked on many Grove Storymap® projects during my 18 years at The Grove. In the beginning, it felt like wading through a swamp of data, struggling to find a way to communicate a client’s complex situation in a clear and simple way. This kind of information design was not like anything I learned as a design major in college.

"After years of practice and collaboration with my esteemed colleagues, Laurie Durnell and Rachel Smith among others, it has gotten easier. Below is a summary of some things I have learned."

http://news.grove.com/2016/09/29/storymap-project-lessons-a-designers-perspective/

Resist the urge to jump straight to the point

Sharing the bottom line up front (BLUF) isn't always a best practice. Participants may have zero context around the issue you're about to share. Especially when you have a lot of information to share, it may be tempting to jump into the "need to know" info. An ounce of framing a conversation properly is worth a pound of trying to convince someone who's not ready to listen. Context, purpose, and WHY THIS MATTERS is everything. 

Avoiding chalk and talk

With text-heavy presentations, borrow a page from Edward Tufte, who said, "People read four or five times faster than you talk. Rather than reading your audience the text of your PowerPoint, write a paper, print it, hand it out, and say, 'Take a few minutes, read this, then we'll have a discussion.'"

 

That transmits information much more quickly. It holds attention better than a briefing. It prevents people from asking premature questions that would have been answered later in the deck. And it gives space to people who want to expand and reflect on certain points time to do so (after the reading.)

 

The first time you do it, the silence may feel awkward, but that evaporates quick when people get into the reading.

 

One thing I do is to ask people to simply make eye contact with me once they're done reading so I know they're finished.

Tenets for framing a Visioning exercise

- Vision is a view of the future

- It is the long-term change that is desired

- It should be inspiring and memorable

- It shouldn't contain jargon and technical terms

- It can be easily explained...would your next-door neighbor get it?

- It is not frequently reviewed & revised...as one might do with a mission statement

- It is a Postcard from the future

- Aspirational, yet realistic and achievable

- Motivational enough to engage others on the journey

RESULT: The teams start thinking about how to apply their strengths to get there.

Bibliography additions

Brandy Agerbeck's The Graphic Facilitator's Guide
Beyond Words by Milly R. Sonneman
"The Functional Art" by Alberto Cairo 
"Design for Information" by Isabel Meirelles 
"Visual Complexity: Mapping Patterns of Information" by Manuel Lima 
"Infographics Designers' Sketchbooks" by Steven Heller and Rick Landers
"Book from the ground" by Xu Bing
Infographics: The Power of Visual Storytelling by Lankow, Ritchie
Information is Beautiful and Knowledge is Beautiful by David McCandless
'Understanding Comics', 'Making Comics' and 'Reinventing Comics' by Scott McCloud
The sketchnote handbook
Edward Tufte, envisioning information
David Sibbett - Visual Meetings and Visual Leaders
Doodle Revolution from Sunni Brown
 Stephen Few for practical advice on graphics for data viz
Dan Roam (Blah Blah Blah and Back of the Napkin) 
Robert Mayer on MultiMedia Learning Theory.
Oceans of Data by Scripts Oceanography

Draw Your Future

Patti's TEDxRainier talk has an inspiring message about how to Draw Your Future using guided imagery and the brain's ability to envision realities to change the world around you.

What is a vision map?

complex visuals that tell a story, show context, share large amounts of information all at once, promote systems thinking, build shared meaning, show details, themes and patterns, and activates creative thinking. 

image.jpg

Bibliography

  • A Whack on the Side of the Head. von Oech, Roger
  • Directing the Story: Professional Storytelling and Storyboarding Techniques for Live Action and Animation. Glebas, Francis 
  • Drawing Solutions: How Visual Goal Setting Will Change Your Life. Patti Dobrowolski
  • Facilitator's Guide to Participatory Decision-Making, Second Edition. Kaner, Sam
  • Gamestorming: A Playbook for Innovators, Rulebreakers, and Changemakers. Gray, Dave, Sunni Brown, James Macanufo 
  • On the Origin of Stories: Evolution, Cognition, and Fiction. Boyd, Brian
  • Picture your Business Strategy. Chopyak, Christine
  • Resonate: Present Visual Stories that Transform Audiences. Duarte, Nancy 
  • Sketching User Experiences: Getting the Design Right and the Right Design. Buxton, Bill
  • The Back of the Napkin: Solving Problems and Selling Ideas with Pictures. Roam, Dan
  • The Graphic Facilitator's Guide. Brandy Agerbeck
  • The Sketchnote Handbook: The Illustrated Guide to Visual Note Taking. Mike Rohde
  • The Thinker's Toolkit: 14 Powerful Techniques for Problem Solving. Jones, Morgan D.
  • Unfolding the Napkin: The Hands-On Method for Solving Complex Problems with Simple Pictures. Dan Roam
  • Use Both Sides of Your Brain, Third Edition. Buzan, Tony
  • Visual Leaders: New Tools for Visining, Management, and Organization Change. Sibbet, David

 

Table of Contents

My colleagues have inspired me to make progress on the book. Here's a first revision of the table of contents: 

See Your Ideas: A Guide To Crafting Strategic Visuals

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Dedication

Forward

Preface

Introduction

- The power of strategic visuals

- What is a storymap?

Discovery

- Beginning with the Blank Page

- Knowing Yourself

- Planning your Approach

Gathering

- Following Footprints

- Gallery Walks

- Graphic Facilitation

- Traditional Facilitation and Graphic Recording

- Visual Templates

- Mindmapping

Pathfinding

- Visual Triage

- Identifying Themes

- Finding Landmarks

- Red Thread

Marking the Way

- Sketching the Journey

- Refining the Path

- Creating the Map

Sharing the Journey

- Showing the Way

- Holding the Space

- Engaging the Audience

- Record and Replay

Additional Resources

 

Introduction

Pictures with a Brain is a guide to creating visual "storymaps:" sophisticated illustrations that on the one hand articulate intricate complexities but on the other hand are easy for anyone to create.

Read More